Motivation

Sunglasses, Summer Weight Loss, Goaly Blog

Skinny is Better Than Sex

Chances are you’d give up sex this summer to make sure you don’t gain 10 pounds.

According to weight-loss experts Nutrisystem, 52 percent of women in America would drop sex to avoid gaining a 10-spot.

With summer fast approaching, our waistlines are giving us that menacing stare that makes us want to stop eating altogether in order to slim down for our next trip to the beach.

There’s no way were going to give up food for the summer, but Nutrisystem says there’s a lot of other things (including sex) to which we’d say “Adios” if we had the chance to get a flat tummy:

  • The majority of Americans said they think they need to lose 23 pounds in order to feel sexy.
  • One in four men would give up sex for the summer if they could avoid gaining 10 pounds.
  • More Americans would prefer to shed 10 to 20 pounds this summer than get promoted at work
  • About three out of four Americans are willing to give up television, their cell phones or their computers for a  flat tummy

The Secret To Success: 4 Life Coaches Offer Awesome Insight

Finding the motivation to shed pounds is easy enough — we want to feel amazing when we strip down and dig our toes into the sand.

However, Nutrisystem says that as much as we want to lose weight, many of us are just too stubborn. We don’t want to give up the pound-producing foods that add inches to our waists.

Measure, Summer Weight Loss, Goaly Blog

Now before you whip out the tape measure and read those fateful numbers, take step back from your pre-summer enthusiasm and make a plan of attack which includes the advice of some of the best life coaches in the business.

4 Ways to Make Your Summer Weight Loss Plan a Success

1. One Change at a Time

Julie Ferman, a popular dating coach in Los Angeles, said the key to keep the weight off this summer is to narrow down your strategies to a single, focused objective.

“Pick ONE THING that you are wanting to change and that you are willing to change,” Ferman said, “and just DO IT.”

She gave us four great examples of single goals you can start doing today:

  • Work out: Thirty minutes of exercise that you’re currently not doing
  • No booze or sweets: Eliminating be eliminating alcohol or sugar six days a week
  • Adios to late-night snacks: No eating after 7 p.m.
  • Go healty: Change the nature of your snacks

2. Make the Trade

Financial coach Michelle Tascoe is an expert in numbers and investment. Her dollar sense carries over pretty easily to the weight loss world: sometimes it’s better to cut out the short-term profits for the long-term wealth.

“How you do anything is how you do everything,” Tascoe said. “What are the short-term gratifications that you can trade for long-term success?”

Snacking, Summer Weight Loss, Goaly Blog

Yes — if you want to look good this summer you’re going to have to give up the glorious short-term deliciousness of, for example, McDonald’s, six packs of Sierra Nevada, all those amazing pastries you devour for breakfast and hallowed halls of your favorite neighborhood pizzeria.

Of course, these aren’t the only short-term gratifications you have to give up. Each person is an individual. For you, your short-term mistress may be the bag of Skittles you have stashed in your desk at work or the growler of IPA tucked away in the back of the fridge in your man cave.

If you want long-term change, you’ll have to start making some hard choices about your short-term habits.

3. Feel It Out

For New York Times bestselling author and Law of Attraction coach Christy Whitman, succeeding with summer weight loss doesn’t start with a waist measurement, I-will-abstain-from-chocolate pronouncement or a Facebook post promising all your friends you’re going to be OMG-skinny! by July.

“Focus on how you want to feel in your body. Spend as much concentrated time as you can basking in this feeling.”

“Focus on how you want to feel in your body,” Whtiman said. “Spend as much concentrated time as you can basking in this feeling.”

As you let this feeling encapsulate you, you’ll be empowered to change the way you approach you goal.

“Allow this feeling to become dominant in your energy field,” she said, “and soon it will influence your thoughts, your beliefs, and your choices.”

4. See the New You

Big changes rarely come without thinking big.

If you’ve become trapped in a self-image in which you can’t see beyond who you are in the moment, it will be very difficult to reach the goals you want for the summer. You have to see the possibility of a trimmer body and believe you can change your reality in order to get there, said Lisa Read, a U.K. parenting coach.

Walking on Beach, Summer Weight Loss, Goaly Blog

“In my experience, people tend to live up to their own self-image, meaning that if they see themselves as overweight and unable to change that, this is the result they’ll get,” Read said. “If this is the case, the first step is to work on creating a new self-image, by visualising what you want and imagining it has already happened.”

Once you’ve seen the new future you, you can put together a compelling plan for success. But not without asking yourself the hard questions first, Read said:

  • What makes you think you want to lose weight?
  • How determined are you to make a change?
  • How much do you really believe it is possible for you to lose weight?

Adding to You Summer Weight Loss Plan

Losing weight, sticking with your goals and succeeded in areas where you normally fail are the realm of self-development. Each of the coaches who helped us with this article have years of wisdom, experience and expertise to share with you.

Take a look at the videos below to get to know them a little better!

Christy Whitman

Lisa Read

Michelle Tascoe

Julie Ferman

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Teen, Lisa Read, Goaly Blog

You Don’t Have to Do it the Hard Way

The art of motivating a teen can resemble dentistry – there’s a lot of pushing, pulling, pain-laden groans and brute strength.

Unlike the dentist’s office where your dentist sees you for a few hours a year, you have to live with your teenager every day. Should you be content with the impasse you feel every time you try to motivate your son or daughter, or can inspiring them be more than the parental equivalent of pulling teeth?

We talked with expert parenting coach Lisa Read about the finer points of managing your teen’s motivation. She gave us three simple steps to make it happen.

1. Focus on connection first

The old saying “They don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care,” may be a little campy, but it’s 100 percent true.

You can spend hours lecturing your teen on right, wrong and what you’d do if you were them, but your effectiveness boils down to your ability to connect with your son or daughter.

“If a teen feels that you really are interested in their well-being, they are far more likely to listen to your advice.”

“If a teen feels that you really are interested in their well-being, they are far more likely to listen to your advice,” Read said. “Teenagers often complain to me that they’re not listened to by the adults in their lives, they’re just told what to do.”

2. Offer choices

“You will do this” is not nearly as effective as “Here are three different jobs you can do,’ Read said. Giving your teen choices allows them to take ownership over their daily routine.

Teenager, Lisa Read, Goaly Blog

 

“If you’re trying to motivate a teen to be more helpful around the home, for example, you could discuss with them what your needs are,” Read said, “and ask them to come up with ideas about what they could do to help.”

Allowing them to choose their job or their task gives them a small slice of ownership in your plan.

“This gives them a sense of control over their situation, and you still get to have a tidier house,” Read said.

3. Create buy-in

Teenagers are much more willing to help you or help themselves when they can see the bigger picture behind what they’re doing.

“If you want a teenager to be motivated, they need to buy into the purpose behind what you’re wanting them to do.”

“If you want a teenager to be motivated, they need to buy into the purpose behind what you’re wanting them to do,” Read said. “Think about the outcome you’re aiming for and ask yourself, ‘What would have got me motivated when I was a teenager myself?”

As you go through this process, you’ll notice most of your own memories will involve three factors, Read said:

  • Inspiring stories
  • Positive encouragement
  • Clearly setting out expectations all help

Want Some More Parenting Tips?

Lisa Read’s Goaly video strategy is titled “Relieving Mother Guilt”. Her free step-by-step sessions help moms work through their feelings and thoughts in order to bring them to a point of freedom and confidence. Dads can benefit, too.

In the meantime, take a look at Lisa’s introduction on Goaly’s YouTube channel:

Tired Girl, Tips for Getting Unstuck, Goaly Blog

Goodbye Rut, Hello New Reality!

“I feel stuck.”

It’s something we hear a lot from our colleagues, people who visit Goaly and from ourselves from time to time.

Providing a technical definition for stuckness is difficult. In simple terms, it refers to those moments or seasons in life where we feel like we can’t make any progress – no forward movement – no matter how much we want it.

Most of the time we aren’t aware of the forces amid our stuckness which are keeping us chained to one spot.

We turned to some amazing coaches to talk to us about what causes us to be stuck and how we can break free from our limitations and move forward.

We’re Ruled by the Terrible F.M.B.

The problem
Forbes columnist, leadership trainer and  career coach Kathy Caprino says many of us are stuck in one certain spot in life because we’re ruled by fears, mindsets and behaviors (FMB) we’ve developed over the years.

“We don’t realize that these fears, mindsets and behaviors not only hold us back, but they actually co-create and attract what’s happening in our lives,” Caprino told us.

The Solution
Getting out of this FMB dominion is a matter of taking ourselves to the next level of thought, a level where we have control over what we do and who we want to be.

“It’s only when we shift internally and empower ourselves to think, act and believe at a higher level can the outer changes we long for become a reality.”

“It’s only when we shift internally and empower ourselves to think, act and believe at a higher level can the outer changes we long for most become a reality,” Caprino said. “Einstein said, ‘A problem can’t be solved on the level of consciousness that created it.’ Truth!”

We Love Our Internal Auto-Pilot Setting

The Problem
Dating coach Julie Ferman
pointed out we have a knack for falling into a routine of behavior that becomes our way of life not because it’s best, but because it’s easiest.

“We tend to keep doing things the same way. We get stuck in ruts, patterns of thought and behavior, and it’s uncomfortable to do something new and different,” Ferman said. “It’s ‘easier’ to just be on auto-pilot, going about our day’s journey in a way that’s already known.”

The Solution
The best way to break out of our auto-pilot rut, Ferman said, is to make the choice to be courageous and thoughtful.

“It takes courage and commitment to stop, think, and act or behave in a new way by choice as opposed to instinct or pattern,” she said.

“We honor our humanity by stepping into that place of courage and commitment, initiating a new reality for ourselves.”

In fact, choosing to break out of our auto-pilot actions and embrace a new life is one of the unique things which makes us human.

“As humans we have the ability to choose… and that’s what’s uniquely special about being human,” she said. “We honor our humanity by stepping into that place of courage and commitment, initiating a new reality for ourselves.”

Happy Girl, Overcoming Our Ruts
Change is possible through courage and commitment…

We Don’t Think We Can Change

The Problem
Aboodi Shabi, one of the United Kingdom’s leading leadership developers and transformation coaches
, told us many of his clients don’t truly believe they can change.

They get so accustomed to living their life according to their habits — both good and bad — they don’t realize they are capable of changing themselves and leaping out of their rut and into a new reality.

“We can fall into believing that we can’t really change who we are.”

The solution
Identifying the the thoughts which underpin our belief that we can’t change is a key to getting unstuck.

“We can … fall into believing that we can’t really change who we are,” he said. “If we don’t address the your core beliefs and interpretations, then new learning isn’t likely to stick.”

Reaching Back in Time

The Problem
Leading financial coach Michelle Tascoe
said many of us live our lives a certain way based on our tendency to look to previous events in our life for answers about what to do in the present.

“People get stuck in a pattern when they look to the past/experience for answers,” she said. “By doing this they get more of the past and never create a new future.”

When you’re stuck looking to the past for what you want, you tend to lose sight of what you truly desire in the present.

The Solution
Tascoe told us the key to making a change in your life is to know what you want and to desire a transformation.

“Just wanting to change isn’t enough. If you don’t know where you want to go you’ll never get there.”

“I am shocked by how many of my clients initially don’t really know what they want,” Tascoe said. “There is a saying that people perish for lack of vision. Just wanting to change isn’t enough. If you don’t know where you want to go you’ll never get there.”

Caught in Core Beliefs

The Problem
“Human beings get ‘stuck’ in particular habits of being when our core beliefs – about ourselves, about other people, and about the world itself – are inconsistent with the results we desire to achieve,” certified Law of Attraction coach and life coach trainer Christy Whitman told us.

For instance, she said, if you believe that you are inadequate, that belief becomes a filter through which you interpret everything that happens.

The Solution
Most of the time, that filter will reinforce your belief you are inadequate. If you wan’t to break out of the life you’ve been living, you’ll need to expose these beliefs.

“By bringing these hidden beliefs to the light and taking actions that challenge their validity we shift our consciousness and later our reality.”

“By bringing these hidden beliefs to the light and taking actions that challenge their validity,” Whitman said, “we shift our consciousness and alter our reality.”

If you want to know more about Christy’s introductory video for Goaly:

Classroom, Motivating Teenagers, Goaly Life Coach Blog

It’s not impossible to motivate your teenager.

This week we talked with academic coach Hayden Lee who specialize in working with teenagers and families. If there is anything we’ve learned from them, it’s that teenagers have the tremendous potential to surprise not only you, but themselves as well.

 

In most cases, though, that surprising ability doesn’t happen magically. It takes a discerning parent, guardian or educator to draw out the awesome which lies just beneath the surface of their teenager’s rather disinterested gaze.

1. Identify a short-term goal

While it may sound deliciously idealistic to help your teenager create a massive goal that doesn’t seem possible, academic coach Hayden Lee says taking small steps is a great way to increase the likelihood your teenager will follow through on his or her goal. 

Creating a short-term goal makes the goal more manageable.

“Creating a short-term goal makes the goal more manageable,” Lee said. “Using the school calendar is a good marker.”

As an example, Hayden said using the end of the semester is a great goal for students who want to raise their grades.

2. Figure out what your teenager needs to transform in himself or herself.

Once the goal is set in place, your teenager can compare what that goal requires to their current state of mind, pattern of thinking or habitual actions. 

Identify what change that you need to make in yourself in order to make that goal easier to achieve.

In most cases, there will be a disconnect between the desired goal – in this case, getting better grades by the end of the semester – and the desired behavior to reach that goal.

“Identify what change you need to make in yourself in order to make that goal easier to achieve,” Lee said.

In the case of his example  (the student who wants to raise his or her grades by the end of the semester), the student might realize they have to take school more seriously in order to reach their goal.

3. Discover the “how” of your goal.

Goals are a great thing to have, Lee said, but they have a tendency to be vague. They might answer the question of “What?” but they don’t always answer the question of “How?”

Answering the “how” aspect of your goal can be just as important as the goal itself. 

Start making concrete and specific action steps that are within your control.

“Start making concrete and specific action steps that are within your control that will contribute toward your goal,” Lee said. “Using the example above, since the teen wants to improve his grades and wants to put in more effort in school, his action step can be to write in his planner every day and to plan out exactly what time he will begin homework during the week.

4. Plan out what you’ll do after school

It’s easy to lose sight of a goal if you aren’t reminded of it every day through intentional, direct planning.

This principle carries over into the life of your teenager. Reaching their goal will be much easier if they have a constant sense of direction and purpose – planning each school day is an invaluable asset to this sense of forward movement. 

It’s much easier to stay motivated when you know exactly what to do and when to do it.

“It’s much easier to stay motivated when you know exactly what to do and when to do it,” Lee said. “Encourage your teenager to use a planner every day in every class in which to write down their homework and to plan out how they will spend their time after school.”

One of the best ways to do this is to have your teenager set aside time on Sunday night to do most of the planning. With planner in hand, they can write out their schedule for each day, including what homework/project is due and what they’ll accomplish after school.

 

Need a Little More Motivational Wisdom?

Hayden Lee’s step-by-step strategy, “Sustaining Motivation”, gives you and your teenager nine quick videos which can help you both maintain your motivation for the things in which you want to succeed.

Click here to get started on “Sustaining Motivation”!

 

Photo Credit: Christopher Sessums, Flickr Creative Commons

“I freed hundreds of slaves. I could have freed thousands more, if they had only known they were enslaved.” - Harriet Tubman

It wasn’t until 5 years after my husband left our 23-year marriage that I realized I had been enslaved.

I remember standing in our kitchen while we were still married, saying to myself that this was a wonderful life I was living but it wasn’t mine. We had “everything” on the outside but there was a void, a disconnect to what mattered on the inside & I ached for it.

Building a house to families without a home - with my beloved children!
Building a house to families without a home – with my beloved children!

When my was-been (ex-husband) wanted to buy the big home on the acre lot, I was fearful that it would change our focus but he calmly assured me that it would only enhance our lives.

I trusted him to make that decision on our behalf, even though within me I knew the dangers of what could be the underlying motivation. In time, the focus insidiously shifted from investing in the meaningful foundation of our marriage to the outer appearance of how we were perceived.

Monies that were once available to give away or experience a life-changing adventure began to be primarily  poured into the home & outward appearances.

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Bucket Loads of Stuff

I get it … “everyone” does it, right? But I’m not everyone and he knew that when he married me. I was the adventurous, soulful, truth-seeking girl that passionately inspires change in the world.

Time & energy was being redirected by the bucket loads to things, stuff & what-nots. Frankly, there is nothing wrong with “stuff” unless it sucks you dry of vibrant life-giving energy & becomes what you live for.

There is nothing wrong with ‘stuff’ unless it sucks you dry of vibrant life-giving energy & becomes what you live for…

Sadly, it became apparent that he was unconsciously being swept up into creating the “perfect” life that served the ego not the soul.

The essence of our marriage was being sucked dry & the once heart-felt connection we had experienced was being replaced with harsh expectations, cold connections, bone-chilling distance. However, it was in no way apparent on the outside.

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The Odd-Girl Out

Thirsty to make a difference I still found my way to Calcutta, India, and Addis Abba, Ethiopia, to work with Mother Teresa’s Missionaries of Charity.

I spent months of my life serving & speaking in Mexico, Nicaragua, Russia, India & trekking in the wilderness, climbing Kilimanjaro. Each time, I’d return to the palatial home we lived in and felt like the odd-girl out.

Mother Teresa said that you can find Calcutta in every part of the world, wherever you find the lonely, the forgotten. I began a ministry to high school & college-age kids in the urban core and filled that huge home with inner-city kids.

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Over the past decade, I started to intensely study yoga, meditation, mindfulness & intertwining these practices to an even deeper level in my life.

With my BS in Occupational Therapy, I received my MA in Leadership from seminary and became an ordained minister. I was raised Catholic, went to a Presbyterian seminary and became an ordained Baptist minister.

I’ve studied Buddhist, Hindu, Sikh and Christian meditation and became certified as a meditation instructor from the Chopra Institute. After working 1-on-1 with Martha Beck (one of Oprah’s Life Coaches) for three years, I became certified as one of her Life Coaches. I studied and became certified as a Jin Shin Jyutsu (an ancient form of acupressure) practitioner, studied Resonance repatterning and Kundalini Yoga.

Seeking The Deeper Truth

As a truth seeker, I awakened to the reality that the body, mind and soul are inextricably linked. We are designed to live in sync. I have explored this connection in my soulful & physical adventures of marathons, triathlons, rock climbing, backpacking, hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding and yoga. 

The body, mind and soul are inextricably linked.

I also deeply value expressing the soul creatively through art, dance, singing, music, theatre, writing & film. We are experiential beings designed to explore our potential in every area that we are intrigued by. These explorations are invaluable to our expansion body, mind & soul.

 

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I unequivocally believe that there are many currencies that make up being wealthy and that investments in one’s self is the only lasting investment that compounds, hence my studies were/are my most valuable investments.

The currency of energy, enthusiasm, love, family, friends, creativity, health, knowledge, wisdom, compassion, passion and purpose are invaluable.  Money is only one currency & the one most highly regarded in our culture.

The currency of energy, enthusiasm, love, family, friends, creativity, health, knowledge, wisdom, compassion, passion and purpose are invaluable.

Wealth can be an incredible blessing but it can also be the source of a great deal of havoc when it is valued above authentic currencies.

Bone-Crushing Divorce

When my was-been left, I was baffled and completely unable to wrap my head around what had occurred. I had changed, continued to evolve through yoga, meditation, nutrition, soul seeking but I was simply on the same trajectory I had always been. What made it so unbearable that he would up and leave? I’m not sure I will ever make sense of it.

 

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It was a bone-crushing divorce. The need to control and crush was undeniable and evident to all. In utter disbelief, I wrestled to make sense of my new adversary: negotiating life as a single parent.

Left With the Shards

The confident, strong, capable, effervescent, adventurous, playful, loving, thriving woman and mom was replaced by an anxious, scared, hurt, beaten-down, protective single mom fighting to survive.
During this five-year period:
  • I had become a single mother
  • My best friend died after her eight-year battle with cancer
  • My best friend from college committed suicide
  • My dad died
  • We lost our family home
  • The family in which I had invested my hear was nowhere to be found
  • The economy crashed

I panicked and secured a full-time job in public television, pushing aside my motivational speaking and life/wellness coaching business. The life I created was obliterated, and with it everything I loved and in which I invested had vanished.

The life I created was obliterated, and with it everything I loved and in which I invested had vanished.

I was left alone with the shards to create a new life for the 3 of us & we called ourselves “Stronghold 3”.  We’d huddle together in that big house on one small couch.  We were inseparable.
I was their rock where they weathered all the crazy changes that were going on in their dad’s life. Desperate for attention of my own, I started dating two guys at once: Ben & Jerry. I went to bed with them every night to spoon.
Over time, they became clingy & I became fluffy. After the shock waves finally lifted, my body was depleted of energy and my heart was drained of all joy.
Once a marathoner and triathlete, my body felt like it was filled with lead, my heart empty and my mind stuck in “poor-me” thoughts. I was unable to run more than three miles and my workouts were puny. Stamina depleted, I was overwhelmed with the stress of being a single-mom and my playful energy tank was empty. I grieved the loss of what our family would never be and I got stuck in my dark sadness.

I grieved the loss of what our family would never be and I got stuck in my dark sadness.

It’s wild to think that my mother died at 56 from anger, bitterness and resentment after her debilitating divorce. She was overweight, inactive & a sugarholic. Diabetic with high blood pressure, she had three heart attacks in a 10-day period and her body did not have the stamina to recover.
We discovered that she had been addicted to valium. Although she sought help through counseling, she was unable to integrate the insights to elicit change. She was unable to be a strong mother. From as young as I can remember, it was my job to take care of her.
On May 6th, 2015, I turned 56: the age my mother was when she died. I am passionate about being in the most vibrant health ever…mind, body, soul.

Settled for Less

I  made the best of life after divorce but realized that I had settled for less. I had somehow begun to believe that as a single mother my life would be less than that of a married woman and that my opportunities would be bound by my limitations. When overcome by my loneliness, I found fleeting thoughts of suicide sting me.

 I had somehow begun to believe that as a single mother my life would be less than that of a married woman.

However, the undying love of my kids would not allow me to entertain that possibility. They needed me and I was here to sacrifice everything for them…they are my heart and my soul. It was devastating to not be able to protect them from the pain of the master control games spouses play amid a divorce.

The Most Painful Consequence

I did all I could to avoid the power struggles, but to no avail. This is perhaps the most painful of consequence of divorce My own father told me about his divorce through a note he left on my dresser asking me to tell my mother that he had moved out and wanted a divorce.

My deepest hope was that my kids would never experience the turmoil of a torn family and instead they got it in spades! Dodging, maneuvering, orchestrating…I twisted myself into all sorts of parenting positions to offer relief and protection for my babes with no concern about what it was costing me.  I desperately did not want them to experience what I did but no matter what I did, it was impossible. They were crushed and I could not protect them.

Finding Guts and Grit

However, in time I realized that just like before the divorce, I was not living the life I was intended to live — I wasn’t the adventurous, soulful, truth-seeking girl passionately inspiring change in the world I knew myself to be.  I was the beaten-down version of myself who hinted to reflections of my mom but in no way reflected the truth about myself. So it was time…time to find the guts and grit to start ALL over.
My first step was to stop buying into the self-limiting beliefs that, as a single mother, my opportunities were limited and to push through the belief that I had missed the boat.

My first step was to stop buying into the self-limiting belief that, as a single mother, my opportunities were limited.

I had been hesitating to take my kids across the border to Tijuana, Mexico to build a home for precious families who lived in cardboard. How could I, a single 5’2”, tiny flaca [blonde white chick in Spanish] risk taking her kids across the border — not to mention the financial cost and time away from work?
But somehow, someway I knew that if I decided to go the doors would open in the most unlikely way. And open they did.

Crossing the Border

Stronghold3! crossed the border, slept in tents, had bucket showers, swung hammers, mixed concrete by hand & built a 22′ x 11′ home for a beautiful family of six.
I reconnected with my passion to make a difference with my kids alongside of me. This was a significant step in re-embracing my true self. It reignited the guts & grit within me to keep tackling the next challenge & embracing the next opportunity.

I reconnected with my passion to make a difference with my kids alongside me. This was a significant step in re-embracing my true self.

I left my job at KCPT public television after two years of seeking the illusion of security and putting aside my life’s calling.  Opportunities began to appear out of seemingly nowhere urging me to risk returning to my passion and purpose as a life/wellness coach and speaker.
I mustered up the courage, let go of my grip on fear and at the very moment I left public television, KCTV5 asked me to be their life and wellness expert with a regular TV spot called “YOU GOT THIS!”. I was on-air live five days later. Then the Kansas University Medical Center’s Department of Integrative Medicine, an incredible cutting edge team focused on a holistic approach, referred clients to me as their wellness coach.
TV, radio,speaking gigs, articles and ideal clients began appearing effortlessly. My professional strength and traction were building. I felt led to rebuilding my physical strength and stamina to re-energize my body, mind & soul.

Revitalized

So I took myself through a mind/body transformation to reclaim my strength to see how far I could go. I cleansed, trained and fueled my body with the most nutrient-dense nourishment I could find.  I was amazed that my energy was revitalized beyond what I had ever experienced in my life. I was running faster, my body was stronger and sleeker and momentum was building. I am now beyond elated at my body’s ability to handle stress.

 I was amazed that my energy was revitalized beyond what I had ever experienced in my life.

At the same time, I realized that my head needed to be in the game. If I was to cleanse my body I had to cleanse my mind of all the negative thoughts sabotaging me. This was quite the challenge as I had replayed the divorce over and over again in my head, trying to figure what had happened and how to never repeat that painful experience ever again.
Without realizing it because of my weakened state,  I was creating more of the same pain by focusing on the difficulties. Reflection serves a purpose but once we learn from it, it’s time to recreate new stories of promise and embracing potential.

Embracing Who Your Are

Hence, I created my “YOU GOT THIS!” Body Fit, Mind Fit, Soul Fit philosophy. I began to fervently practice these tools in order to exemplify my  motto: “Live it to Give it!”
I knew that I was not the only woman who had been betrayed, bludgeoned and lost sight of her strength and calling. All too often, women in their 50’s can begin to believe that their lives no longer matter.
They have most likely sacrificed a great deal of themselves in the raising of their kids and in support of their halfhearted marriages. It’s scary to step out beyond what you know to embrace the unknown but the world is waiting for you.

All too often, women in their 50’s can begin to believe that their lives no longer matter. 

The world needs you to embrace the truth of who you are, coupled with the tremendous life experience you have to own your voice & live out loud.  Your wisdom, grace, life experiences and heartbreaks have prepared you for this time in your life.

Don’t settle for less than who you are. Dare to live it.

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And, as T.S. Eliot said:

“It’s never too late too be what you might have been.” 

Keep a Journal, Staying Motivated, Goaly Life Coach Blog

Finding the Spark that Pushes You

Have you ever met one of those people who seem to always have energy and enthusiasm for whatever it is they’re doing? Their zeal is infectious, but at the same time, it can be annoying!

We wonder how it’s possible to be so motivated in a world where most people miserable at work, exhausted or unsatisfied with their life.

We wanted to get the opinion of the people who are right in the middle of the daily struggles of parents, teachers, kids, executives and employees. So, we talked with several of our Goaly.com coaches.

We asked them: How do you stay motivated in your life?

Keep a Journal

A journal can be your catalyst for change – use it as the place where you write down your goals and track your personal development.

“A journal can be your catalyst for change. It will act as your inspiration and show you how far you’ve come.”

When you reach a stage in your life where you feel like you’re treading water and you don’t feel inspired to keep pushing forward, your journal will act as your inspiration and show you  how far you’ve come.

“I’ve journaled since the first journal I started in 2005,” financial coach Michelle Tascoe said.  “Ten years later I am on journal 27, and have documented all the lessons, declarations and goals set and reached each step of the way.”

Express Your Gratitude

Our own personal struggles, the way people have hurt us and the seemingly endless stream of news reports of evil acts across the globe tend to make us lose sight of the positives in our life and in our world.

Carve out a few minutes from your day and use them to examine the good things in your life and give thanks for them!

“Taking time every day to remind myself of what I am grateful for helps tremendously.”

“Taking time every day to remind myself of what I am grateful for helps tremendously,” said Hayden Lee, academic coach on Goaly.

Set Goals

Becoming motivated is difficult when you don’t have a clear direction in your life. Whether it’s a short-term goal or a long-term purpose, having a finish line or destination in mind is a tremendous way to motivate yourself.

Goaly parenting coach Lisa Read says goal-setting is an important motivating factor in her life. She even uses a mentor and life coaches to help keep her accountable and stay focused.

“My aim is to continually challenge myself to raise the bar.”

“I set myself long term, yearly, monthly and daily goals so that I’m clear about the direction I’m working towards. I also hire coaches to help me stay on track and I work with a mentor,” she said. “My aim is to continually challenge myself to raise the bar.”

Lisa Read has more great advice for parents. Check out her introductory Goaly video: