Life Coaching

Woman on Cliff, Arvind Devalia, Goaly Blog

Fear is that powerful menace which haunts many of us from the time we are children to the moment of our last breath.

For life coach, psychotherapist and strategist Terri Cole, however, fear isn’t as terrifying as you’d think. Through a few simple, serious steps, you can start to dismantle the walls of fear which have been confining you.

Taking the Terror Out of Fear

1. Fear is just a feeling

We’ve been lulled into believing fear is more than just a feeling.

However, it’s just that: a feeling, an emotion. In the same way that you can be happy, sad, joyous or contemplative, you can be afraid.

“Fear is just like every other emotion, but somehow, in this world, it’s gotten this elevated status,” Cole said. “Start thinking about fear as you would other feelings. You have the power to change the way that you feel.”

“If fear is just a feeling, you have the power to change it.”

Recognizing that fear is just an emotion is a very good thing, Cole said, because it opens you up to be able to control your fears as you would other emotions.

“Imagine that fear is just a feeling and not a fact, how would your life change,” Cole asked. “Unless you live in an active war zone, 98% of the time the fear that you are feeling is just a feeling. If fear is just a feeling, you have the power to change it.”

2. Create a sacred space

Think of the first step in conquering fear — that fear is just a feeling — as the tool you’ll use to start working on your relationship with fear.

You’ll need a workshop to get the work done, and that’s where a “zen den” comes into play.

“This is a sacred space in your home where you can do the work we’re talking about, where you can meditate, to think and to expand,” Cole said.

meditation-fear-terri-cole-2

Decorate your space with calming accents which inspire you, whether they’re candles, pictures of loved ones or leaves and flowers.

“All you want for a zen den is a place for you to take a nice, deep breath and exhale,” Cole said. “This is going to be a place to meditate because this work is best done in a space where you can create some stillness and silence internally.”

3. Relax

Your zen den is the workshop where your work will get done.

In order to get that work started, you’ll need to be relaxed. Calm. Focused. Centered. Getting to that point is a difficult one. For many — Cole included – a state of relaxation is best achieved through mediation.

“You need to have an open mind to see what it is you need to see.”

Once you reach this meditative, relaxed state, you’ll be ready to ask some hard questions in the next tip.

“You need to have an open mind to see what it is you need to see,” Cole aid.

4. Ask Yourself the Hard Questions

“I hope that you’re sitting in your sacred space so that you feel expansive and you’re brave enough to look the real answers for you so you will be able to decode your relationship to fear,” Cole said.

Questions about your family of origin are a key element in confronting your fears and getting to the root of their power over you.

Many times, Cole said, the influence of fear on your life is a direct result of the environment you grew up in. Terri’s “Conquer Your Fears and Find True Freedom” free video strategy explores this environment with a series of probing questions.

We’ve included three of those questions here:

  • What was your family’s relationship to fear? Was there a lot of superstitions? How was your family origin when it came to fear?
  • What was your parents’ view of the world? Did they see it as a generous benevolent place or did they see it as a scary place?
  • Did your parents suffer in their own relationship to their own fear? Did they have anxiety, difficulty sleep or were they always afraid something was going to happen to you?

Bidding Farewell to Fear

As we said before, Terri Cole’s “Conquer Your Fears and Find True Freedom” free video strategy is a tremendous resource for your self-exploration and personal development. Her video also includes a fantastic meditation exercise. Check it out!

In the meantime, you take a look at Terri’s introductory video for her free series on fear:

Carole Ann Rice, Goaly Blog

Coaching is a calling

This week we talked with Carole Ann Rice, an author, life coach and life coach trainer. Carole gave us a great post about why she started a coaching academy, so we’ve decided to post in our the Goaly blog. Enjoy!

 

When I stand up at networking events as my icebreaker I introduce myself thus –“Hello I’m Carole Ann Rice and I’m a life coach and journalist – but don’t let that put you off”. And then I pause for the laughter.

The reason I say this humorously apologetic line is that announcing you are a life coach is often a cue for sighs and groans: “Oh no, not another one.”

Life Coaching: An Ubiquitous Profession

Life coaches are everywhere. We are legion.  You can’t move for them. And many are giving us pukka ones a bad name.

But being trained well and having a professional approach and a commercial take on building a successful business, you can be considered an expert and respected as a person of inspiration and powerful life changing abilities. A bit like Harry Potter only without the wand and more magical.

But being trained well and having a professional approach and a commercial take on building a successful business, you can be considered an expert and respected as a person of inspiration and powerful life changing abilities. 

I have made a great living from being a coach and I equally want to see other coaches enjoying success as professionals. But having coached countless coaches over the years, I am dismayed how ill-equipped they are to set up a busy, abundant practice as well as appearing to have huge holes missing in their training. This is a scary prospect. We’re dealing with people’s lives.

Which is why I wanted to start my own coaching academy.  But more of that later.

Carole Ann’s Coaching Genesis

I trained to become a coach some 12 years ago.  Having been made redundant from the newspaper I wrote for, I hired a coach after reading about these astonishing new phenomena in a magazine. I wanted my coach to help support me as I made my way as a freelance writer

Carole Ann Rice, Goaly Blog

My coach Suzy was a wonder. She supported me, stretched me, challenged me, showed sympathy when needed and a kick up the butt when I went into “poor me” mode. I was a tricky client, a nightmare actually, but I was hooked and became boringly evangelical.  To me coaching made me feel the sky’s the limit.   I still do.

“My coach Suzy was a wonder. She supported me, stretched me, challenged me, showed sympathy when needed and a kick up the butt when I went into ‘poor me’ mode.”

Most of all though I felt truly “got” and Suzy believed in me, so much so that she suggested I retrain and become a coach and work as one of her associates.

Training to Transform

This was singularly the best offer and career choice I’ve ever made.  So with the rest of my redundancy money (about £3000 12 years ago),  I took a two-year course with CoachU; one of the world’s most respected coaching universities and worked my way through around 40 modules (it may have  been more – it was a long time ago).

These modules were conducted via telephone. On American time, we had to phone in to tutor groups and learn in tele-classrooms full of international students from the four corners of the world.  Sometimes it meant competing 4 x 1 hour modules at 2 a.m. with a head full of flu and two under-5 children upstairs and other ungodly hours to fit in with U.S. time zones, but diligently I plowed through.

Coaches are allies and unlike any other profession we can support and work with our competition to build strong practices and mutually beneficial business strands and referrals.

Graduating 12 years ago I have maintained very close connection with two “buddy” coaches I studied with (one of whom I went into business with) and both have become good friends.  Coaches are allies and unlike any other profession we can support and work with our competition to build strong practices and mutually beneficial business strands and referrals.

It was tough getting clients at first and I made a lot of expensive mistakes on the wrong marketing and business services which didn’t really pay off. Then I found what worked for me – press coverage, social media, workshops, networking, mastering public speaking, writing books and creating different programmes. These were sure-fire ways of building a full practice.

The Real Coaching Company: Changing Lives

Over the past 12 years with my Real Coaching Company, I’ve had the privilege to coach scientists, writers, journalists, international CEO’s, actors, dancers, academics, students, entrepreneurs, business start ups, mums, lap dancers and athletes along with ordinary folk stuck at a life crossroads.

My corporate clients have included the London School of Economics, Play England, National Children’s Bureau, Visa, hedge fund banks and several advertising agencies including McCann Erikson.

Carole Ann Rice, Goaly Blog

I have been featured in The Sunday Times, The Independent on Sunday and  Metro News as well as all the fashion glossies and am the only coach in the UK to enjoy a weekly column in a national daily paper – Happy Monday, which features weekly in the Daily Express.

Pure Coaching Academy: Creating Coaches

They say to become a real expert you need to do 10,000 hours of anything and I think I am probably there now and have a sort of instinctual knowledge of what works with clients and how to see beneath the superficial.

I knew I could share my accrued knowledge and experience in a real and practical way and decided to form the Pure Coaching Academy.  I want people to view coaches with awe and respect and see us as professional heavy weights up there with lawyers; not dippy do-gooders or kindly hobbyists come buddies.

“I want people to view coaches with awe and respect and see us as professional heavy weights up there with lawyers; not dippy do-gooders or kindly hobbyists come buddies.”

One of the unsung joys of being a coach is that you grow and develop yourself, jump through your own limitations and see the infinite potential of the human condition. I wouldn’t ask my own clients to do anything I wouldn’t do or haven’t done myself so over the years I have expanded my own personal development and enjoy the on-going journey.  All coaches should.

Pure Coaching Academy with Carole Ann rice from Charlotte Armitage on Vimeo.

Being a life coach puts you on a path of meaning and purpose and you make a real difference as a catalyst of change.  Being a life coach and helping others is a privilege.

You need a good solid training to be become a coach and I have collated some of the most common of the human conditions and issues that keep us stuck and found real tools to help clients move on.

This is what I have distilled down into the modules of my Pure Coaching Academy:

  • People-pleasing
  • Low self-esteem
  • Procrastination
  • Negative belief systems
  • Extreme self care

  • Silencing the inner critic
  • Compelling goal setting
  • Finding your spiritual compass
  • Living in your values
  • Being “need” free
  • The myriad of fear-based behaviours which create life obstacles

Pure Coaching Academy has been designed to short cut coaches to success by sharing tools that I know really and truly work for both client and coach.

At PCA we will help develop the coach’s confidence with role play and real coaching and to build a community of on-going support , training and professional excellence thereafter.  There are no ongoing brain crushing essays to tick academic boxes.

“Being a life coach puts you on a path of meaning and purpose and you make a real difference as a catalyst of change.”

Great coaches don’t need to write dissertations. They need to be armed with ninja coaching tools, empathy, courage compassion and deep understanding of their clients.  Along with great entrepreneurial skills too.  I teach my students this too.

Our coaches will also receive a “coaching bible” which is the ultimate coach’s desktop companion which follows each module direct to your inbox and offers laser coaching questions, a “How To” guide to identify the real issue behind the superficial one and suggested directions and homework ideas for clients.  This will prove to be an invaluable tool. My students love it.

The course is one day a week for 8 weeks (Saturdays 10 a.m.-3 p.m.) plus a one hour teleclass mid-week.  It is highly experiential, the students physically and psychologically go through all the materials and we have real coaching session with real clients too.

Great coaches don’t need to write dissertations. They need to be armed with ninja coaching tools, empathy, courage compassion and deep understanding of their clients.  

At the moment life coaching and coaching schools are pretty unregulated and there appears to be a diverse body of self-appointed authorities creating guidelines and accreditation.

Some involve building up a coaching log of hours while others stipulate coaching principles which differentiate it between psychotherapeutic practices and other practices.

Pure Coaching Academy: Solid Training

I’ll admit I have struggled with these “official” accreditations and have, for now, decided that PCA is, as it says, purely about sharing the very best coaching tools and practices and the real methodology in building an affluent business and mindset needed to do just that.  But accreditation is in the pipeline and all of my past graduates will have access to this standard.

In the 12 years I have been a coach, coaching at academic institutions such as the LSE and Westminster and being a coach has seen me featured in the press, presenting and judging the Angel Film Awards in Monaco, regularly appearing on TV and radio and recently featured in Sky Living Who’d Be A Billionaire series.

I’ve even written two books: “Find Your Dream Job” and “Start Your Dream Business” with Sarah Wade.

Carole Ann Rice, Goaly Blog

I have coached highly accredited  coaches who continue to seek more bits of paper, diplomas and notifications for their education and struggle to get more than two clients in one year.  Often they end up returning to their previous employment.

As a graduate from PCA, we will ensure our coaches are fully equipped and feel ready to take on the awesome task of enabling their clients to reach their goals.

We will support them and encourage them to be at their best and offer ongoing support, meet up groups and further learning.

As a graduate from PCA, we will ensure our coaches are fully equipped and feel ready to take on the awesome task of enabling their clients to reach their goals. 

Since becoming a coach I have never looked back. Happier, hopeful and more inspired than I’ve ever been I know coaching is a life changer.  You probably are already the go-to guy or gal people flock to for advice and counsel.   Why not train well and make a living from that gift?

Be a legend in your own lifetime and live your own legacy. How amazing is that?

Join us www.purecoachingacademy.com for more details. The next course will take place 19th September 2015.

 

Sunset on the Beach, Tricia Huffman, Goaly Blog

Live Your Life. Love Your Life…

There’s a lot of joy to be had in this world.

Life coach and Joylogy founder Tricia Huffman is on a mission to help her clients find it.

Huffman started her career as a sound engineer in the music industry, which led her to making connections with many big-name musicians who eventually were inspired and encouraged by Tricia’s coaching.

“I was working with some of my idols — Grammy Award winners — and  got to see first-hand that even these people who, from the outside look like they have it all, still need inspiration,” Huffman said.

We asked her a series of questions  that we’ve asked many of the phenomenal coaches who’ve worked with us and who offer step-by-step strategies on our site. One of Tricia’s most interesting responses came when we asked her about why people need a life coach.

1. Life Coaches Help You See What You Can’t See

When you want to dream big, your life coach will help you get out of the way so you can head down the road to personal development, growth and the embracing of the life you desire.

A life coach is like a new set of eyes to “help you see what you are not able to see in yourself and for yourself,” Huffman said.

“A life coach is like a new set of eyes to “help you see what you are not able to see in yourself and for yourself.” 

As Tricia Huffman’s fellow coaching experts have pointed out on the Goaly blog, sometimes the work of the coach — joyologist, in this case —  involves helping the client rediscover who they’ve been all along.

Girls, Tricia Huffman, Goaly Blog

 

2. Life Coaches Give an Unbiased View of Your Life

Having a new set of eyes around will be painful but productive — your coach will help you “to have an unbiased, fresh view on yourself and what you are going through and want for your life,” Huffman said.

“Life coaches are going to give you objective advice that you probably won’t get from friends or loved ones who may be afraid to tell you the hard truths

Coaches are professionals, which means when you ask them to come into your life and help you become the person you want to become, they’re going to give you objective advice that you probably won’t get from friends or loved ones who may be afraid to tell you the hard truths.

In fact, Huffman said, that’s part of her coaching style: “I tell it like it is, but I have a heart of gold.”

3. Life Coaches Help You Get Out of Your Own Way

Once you and your coach analyze your life and your desires for your future, you’ll be able to craft a plan together which will help you realize your potential.

Somewhere in that process of formulating a plan, you’re going to need a solid shove from your life coach and your own soul, one that will help you “get out of you own way and really go for the life you dream of.”

“I want for all of us in this world to truly live each day and truly love each day.”

“I want for all of us in this world to truly live each day and truly love each day,” Huffman says on her coaching site. “This world has so much to offer us, day in and day out, no matter where you are or who you are.”

Make This Life Yours

If you like what Tricia Huffman has to say about life, coaching and joy, you can read more about her background and philosophy on her Goaly profile page.

In the meantime, check out her introductory video on Goaly:

Tired Girl, Tips for Getting Unstuck, Goaly Blog

Goodbye Rut, Hello New Reality!

“I feel stuck.”

It’s something we hear a lot from our colleagues, people who visit Goaly and from ourselves from time to time.

Providing a technical definition for stuckness is difficult. In simple terms, it refers to those moments or seasons in life where we feel like we can’t make any progress – no forward movement – no matter how much we want it.

Most of the time we aren’t aware of the forces amid our stuckness which are keeping us chained to one spot.

We turned to some amazing coaches to talk to us about what causes us to be stuck and how we can break free from our limitations and move forward.

We’re Ruled by the Terrible F.M.B.

The problem
Forbes columnist, leadership trainer and  career coach Kathy Caprino says many of us are stuck in one certain spot in life because we’re ruled by fears, mindsets and behaviors (FMB) we’ve developed over the years.

“We don’t realize that these fears, mindsets and behaviors not only hold us back, but they actually co-create and attract what’s happening in our lives,” Caprino told us.

The Solution
Getting out of this FMB dominion is a matter of taking ourselves to the next level of thought, a level where we have control over what we do and who we want to be.

“It’s only when we shift internally and empower ourselves to think, act and believe at a higher level can the outer changes we long for become a reality.”

“It’s only when we shift internally and empower ourselves to think, act and believe at a higher level can the outer changes we long for most become a reality,” Caprino said. “Einstein said, ‘A problem can’t be solved on the level of consciousness that created it.’ Truth!”

We Love Our Internal Auto-Pilot Setting

The Problem
Dating coach Julie Ferman
pointed out we have a knack for falling into a routine of behavior that becomes our way of life not because it’s best, but because it’s easiest.

“We tend to keep doing things the same way. We get stuck in ruts, patterns of thought and behavior, and it’s uncomfortable to do something new and different,” Ferman said. “It’s ‘easier’ to just be on auto-pilot, going about our day’s journey in a way that’s already known.”

The Solution
The best way to break out of our auto-pilot rut, Ferman said, is to make the choice to be courageous and thoughtful.

“It takes courage and commitment to stop, think, and act or behave in a new way by choice as opposed to instinct or pattern,” she said.

“We honor our humanity by stepping into that place of courage and commitment, initiating a new reality for ourselves.”

In fact, choosing to break out of our auto-pilot actions and embrace a new life is one of the unique things which makes us human.

“As humans we have the ability to choose… and that’s what’s uniquely special about being human,” she said. “We honor our humanity by stepping into that place of courage and commitment, initiating a new reality for ourselves.”

Happy Girl, Overcoming Our Ruts
Change is possible through courage and commitment…

We Don’t Think We Can Change

The Problem
Aboodi Shabi, one of the United Kingdom’s leading leadership developers and transformation coaches
, told us many of his clients don’t truly believe they can change.

They get so accustomed to living their life according to their habits — both good and bad — they don’t realize they are capable of changing themselves and leaping out of their rut and into a new reality.

“We can fall into believing that we can’t really change who we are.”

The solution
Identifying the the thoughts which underpin our belief that we can’t change is a key to getting unstuck.

“We can … fall into believing that we can’t really change who we are,” he said. “If we don’t address the your core beliefs and interpretations, then new learning isn’t likely to stick.”

Reaching Back in Time

The Problem
Leading financial coach Michelle Tascoe
said many of us live our lives a certain way based on our tendency to look to previous events in our life for answers about what to do in the present.

“People get stuck in a pattern when they look to the past/experience for answers,” she said. “By doing this they get more of the past and never create a new future.”

When you’re stuck looking to the past for what you want, you tend to lose sight of what you truly desire in the present.

The Solution
Tascoe told us the key to making a change in your life is to know what you want and to desire a transformation.

“Just wanting to change isn’t enough. If you don’t know where you want to go you’ll never get there.”

“I am shocked by how many of my clients initially don’t really know what they want,” Tascoe said. “There is a saying that people perish for lack of vision. Just wanting to change isn’t enough. If you don’t know where you want to go you’ll never get there.”

Caught in Core Beliefs

The Problem
“Human beings get ‘stuck’ in particular habits of being when our core beliefs – about ourselves, about other people, and about the world itself – are inconsistent with the results we desire to achieve,” certified Law of Attraction coach and life coach trainer Christy Whitman told us.

For instance, she said, if you believe that you are inadequate, that belief becomes a filter through which you interpret everything that happens.

The Solution
Most of the time, that filter will reinforce your belief you are inadequate. If you wan’t to break out of the life you’ve been living, you’ll need to expose these beliefs.

“By bringing these hidden beliefs to the light and taking actions that challenge their validity we shift our consciousness and later our reality.”

“By bringing these hidden beliefs to the light and taking actions that challenge their validity,” Whitman said, “we shift our consciousness and alter our reality.”

If you want to know more about Christy’s introductory video for Goaly:

Classroom, Motivating Teenagers, Goaly Life Coach Blog

It’s not impossible to motivate your teenager.

This week we talked with academic coach Hayden Lee who specialize in working with teenagers and families. If there is anything we’ve learned from them, it’s that teenagers have the tremendous potential to surprise not only you, but themselves as well.

 

In most cases, though, that surprising ability doesn’t happen magically. It takes a discerning parent, guardian or educator to draw out the awesome which lies just beneath the surface of their teenager’s rather disinterested gaze.

1. Identify a short-term goal

While it may sound deliciously idealistic to help your teenager create a massive goal that doesn’t seem possible, academic coach Hayden Lee says taking small steps is a great way to increase the likelihood your teenager will follow through on his or her goal. 

Creating a short-term goal makes the goal more manageable.

“Creating a short-term goal makes the goal more manageable,” Lee said. “Using the school calendar is a good marker.”

As an example, Hayden said using the end of the semester is a great goal for students who want to raise their grades.

2. Figure out what your teenager needs to transform in himself or herself.

Once the goal is set in place, your teenager can compare what that goal requires to their current state of mind, pattern of thinking or habitual actions. 

Identify what change that you need to make in yourself in order to make that goal easier to achieve.

In most cases, there will be a disconnect between the desired goal – in this case, getting better grades by the end of the semester – and the desired behavior to reach that goal.

“Identify what change you need to make in yourself in order to make that goal easier to achieve,” Lee said.

In the case of his example  (the student who wants to raise his or her grades by the end of the semester), the student might realize they have to take school more seriously in order to reach their goal.

3. Discover the “how” of your goal.

Goals are a great thing to have, Lee said, but they have a tendency to be vague. They might answer the question of “What?” but they don’t always answer the question of “How?”

Answering the “how” aspect of your goal can be just as important as the goal itself. 

Start making concrete and specific action steps that are within your control.

“Start making concrete and specific action steps that are within your control that will contribute toward your goal,” Lee said. “Using the example above, since the teen wants to improve his grades and wants to put in more effort in school, his action step can be to write in his planner every day and to plan out exactly what time he will begin homework during the week.

4. Plan out what you’ll do after school

It’s easy to lose sight of a goal if you aren’t reminded of it every day through intentional, direct planning.

This principle carries over into the life of your teenager. Reaching their goal will be much easier if they have a constant sense of direction and purpose – planning each school day is an invaluable asset to this sense of forward movement. 

It’s much easier to stay motivated when you know exactly what to do and when to do it.

“It’s much easier to stay motivated when you know exactly what to do and when to do it,” Lee said. “Encourage your teenager to use a planner every day in every class in which to write down their homework and to plan out how they will spend their time after school.”

One of the best ways to do this is to have your teenager set aside time on Sunday night to do most of the planning. With planner in hand, they can write out their schedule for each day, including what homework/project is due and what they’ll accomplish after school.

 

Need a Little More Motivational Wisdom?

Hayden Lee’s step-by-step strategy, “Sustaining Motivation”, gives you and your teenager nine quick videos which can help you both maintain your motivation for the things in which you want to succeed.

Click here to get started on “Sustaining Motivation”!

 

Photo Credit: Christopher Sessums, Flickr Creative Commons

Life coaching has an amazing history…

While it may seem like the field has become popular in the last 10 years, the industry’s roots dig deeply into the soil of the 20th century. Some even say the philosophies of life coaching date back to the ancient Greeks and the famous philosopher Socrates.

“Coaching isn’t something new. It’s built on a lot of history. It’s not magic or hocus-pocus.”

Regardless of when the industry started, you probably want to know why understanding the history of life coaching is important.

The Harvard Expert: Vikki Brock

For this answer, we talked with Vikki Brock, a Harvard grad widely regarded as the authority on the history of coaching.

Vikki Brock, History of Coaching, Goaly Blog

“People need to recognize that coaching isn’t something new and that it’s built on a lot of history,” Brock said. “It’s not magic or hocus pocus or anything.”

For Brock, coaching is a tradition built upon hundreds — if not thousands — of years of important philosophies in the medical and non-medical worlds.

“It’s built on strong, interpersonal skills,” she said. “By understanding that it’s got solid roots, the individual who wants to get coaching may start from a more trusting place and be able to be more open.”

How did coaching get it start?

Great question…you can thank postmodernism for laying the groundwork for the emergence of modern coaching.

Thank You, Postmodernism!

Postmodernism is the thought movement which started in the 50’s and replaced the modernist way of thinking that dominated the world up to that point.

This shift from modernism to postmodernism was a global shift. Here are five examples of how our thinking changed:

  • A scientific world ruled by logic, rationality, objectivity, and analytical thinking gave way to a humanistic mindset where human bonding, networking, subjectivity, community and collaboration ruled.
  • A world where conformity was emphasized was replaced with a world where individualism and human potential took center stage.
  • Our ravenous pursuit of economic wealth faded and in its place emerged the pursuit of meaning, happiness and purpose.
  • The model of leadership in which people at the top teach and decide gave way to the community model of leadership where we learn from each other and participate in decisions together.
  • Change’s pace was relatively predictable, but then became far too fast to predict.

(Source: “Grounded Theory of the Roots and Emergence of Coaching”
by Vikki G. Brock, pp. 346-347)

Individuals started to move away from their support systems (family, friends, etc.) to find work, leaving them without any disciplines aside from psychology to help them cope with their self-directed journeys.

With modernism out of the way and a new reality rising, the world was ready for coaching. But first, it needed a good dose of Gestalt.

Gestalt Therapy

As the seeds of postmodern started to push up through the soil of the global psyche, another important movement was taking place: Gestalt therapy, a psychological tool German psychologist Fritz Perls popularized.

Fritz Perls, History of Coaching, Goaly Blog
Fritz Perls

Perls believed Gestalt therapy focuses on the patient, who has the potential, through the awareness of his or her present feelings and non-verbal cues, to recover his or her lost potential. The answer, Perls thought, lies inside the patient.

Gestalt therapy viewed the individual as an integrated whole made up of thoughts, emotions and feelings.

Gestalt therapy viewed the individual as an integrated whole made up of thoughts, emotions and feelings, a philosophy which fit perfectly with postmodernism. The Gestalt approach could be applied to nearly any coaching situation and  it was from this framework that coaching started grow and mature.

However, the Gestalt method was just part of the picture of coaching’s early history. Other thought leaders came into the picture who shaped coaching.

 

The Major Players in the History of Coaching

As we’ve talked about, we can thank postmodernism for the social environment which made coaching possible. Think of it as the soil.

Then, Gestalt therapy became popular, emphasizing humanism and being present in the moment. Think of this as fertilizer making the soil of postmodernism rich and ready for planting.

A long list of influential thinkers and coaches then arrived to plant and water the seeds that would grow into the diverse, influential industry that is now coaching.

A long list of influential thinkers and coaches then arrived to plant and water the seeds that would grow into the diverse, influential industry that is now coaching.

Though major players came to the forefront in the 60’s and 70’s, Brock said, their ideas and philosophies were built on the influence of psychologists and sports coaches who came before them.

Brock lists psychotherapist and doctor Alfred Adler as the 20th-century source of thinking that paved the way for the emergence of coaching in the postmodern era much in the same the Gestalt method did.

Alfred Adler, History of Coaching, Goaly Blog
Alfred Adler

Adler practiced in the early 1900’s. He emphasized “individual psychology,” in which he believed individuals were whole beings connected to family and society who could use principles of psychology in their own life to bring about personal development.

 

Brock links Adler’s ideas to several men who came after him, including: Napoleon Hill, Martin Heidegger, Carl Jung and Abraham Maslow. These men, along with other psychologists  like Carl Rogers, Virginia Satir and Albert Ellis in turn prepared the field for possibly the most influential name in coaching history, Werner Erhard.

 

Werner Erhard: The Father of Modern Coaching

Werner Erhard might be the single most influential person in the founding of the life coaching industry, not necessarily because he started the idea of coaching but because he started a movement which influenced many important names in coaching’s history.

Werner Erhard, History of Coaching, Goaly Blog

Erhard started his professional career as a salesman, transitioning into several different fields before starting Erhard Seminars Training, or “est” for short.

In 1982, author Steve Tipton wrote about the then-contemporary est movement, saying the principle behind est was simple: find fulfillment in your own path and pursue inner satisfaction along with “outer” success:

“est defines what is intrinsically valuable in self-expressive categories consonant with counter-cultural ideals. Then it uses these personally fulfilling and expressive ends to justify the routine work and goal achievement of mainstream public life. This formula … motivates them to lead this life effectively, with an eye to inner satisfaction as well as external success.”

The idea that you should find a career that fulfills more than your financial desires seems normal now, but at the time, the philosophy was radically different than the modernist mindset which still lingered.

 

Erhard’s Influence: Business, Sports, Ontology, American Coaching

Erhard’s seminar series and teaching influenced thousands of people, some of whom started their own coaching niches based on his philosophies.

The following categories and personalities are sourced from a 2014 presentation by Vikki Brock.

Management and Consulting

Ken Blanchard, Robert Hargrove, Warren Bennis and Peter Senge are four of the big names in the history of management and consulting coaching. Blanchard, author of the bestselling “The One Minute Manager” is perhaps the most famous of the bunch.

Sports

Timothy Gallwey, Sir John Whitmore and Graham Alexander are the key players in this niche.

Gallwey was a tennis coach who created an approach to sports called the Inner Game, in which players ditched self-criticism for self-exploration. Coach and player were partners, a philosophy which became the bedrock of modern coaching.

Alexander and Whitmore are credited with the GROW philosophy of coaching, in which athletes are challenged to come up with a goal, identify the reality, tackle the obstacles and move forward.

Ontology

Erhard’s dialogue with politician and entrepreneur Fernando Flores resulted in the emergence of ontological coaching, a movement that included Rafael Echevarria, Julio Olalla and James Flaherty. This movement has been very influential in the business world.

Rafael Echevarria, History of Coaching, Goaly Blog
Rafael Echevarria

According to Olalla’s Newfield organization, “ ontological coaching addresses the concern for more effective action while also addressing the concerns of the human soul that are mostly left out of our learning practices today”.

American Coaching

Other coaches played an important role in the popularity of coaching in the United States, including names like Laura Whitworth, who co-founded the Coaches Training Institute and the Alliance of Coach Training Organizations, and was a founding member of the Personal Professional Coaches Association; and Thomas Leonard, who founded Coach U, the International Coach Federation, the International Association of Coaches and Coachville.

Three  Important Philosophies
Within Coaching’s History

The names we mentioned were largely responsible for the rise of coaching in the modern world. In the midst of this growth, several important philosophies integrated themselves into mainstream coaching:

Hypnotherapy: Milton Erickson

Erickson was a psychiatrist and psychotherapist who championed using hypnosis as a form of therapy. Though Erickson wasn’t a coach, per se, his 1950’s theories on using his own casual version of hypnosis became a popular trend in the years to come in the coaching world. For example, U.K. life coach Gary Amers is a clinical hypnotherapist.

The Inner Game: Timothy Gallwey

Gallwey was Werner Erhard’s tennis coach and author of a book called “The Inner Game of Tennis” Gallwey’s ideas about coaching and the mind were eventually used in the business world, spawning what is today a popular area of life coaching.

Timothy Gallwey, History of Coaching, Goaly Blog
Timothy Gallwey

The book, published in 1974, made the distinction between the outer game (the actual competition) and the inner game (the competitor’s mind). The “Inner Game” philosophy emphasizes methods for removing anxiety and self-doubt of the inner game to produce positive results in the outer game.

Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP): Richard Bandler and John Grinder

Bandler and Grinder are two very popular names in the coaching world. In the 1970’s they originated the method of coaching known as NLP, in which coach and client can use the client’s neurology, language and experiences to reach the client’s goals.

Bandler and Grinder’s philosophies about communication and coaching are a combination of several different ideas, including Milton Erickson’s hypnotherapy and Perls’ Gestalt therapy.

Leaving the Church, Looking for Help:
The 1990’s & Beyond

Another important cultural factor in the rise in coaching has been the decline in worldwide church attendance:

Just like postmoderns leaving their homes and their support systems, churchgoers are leaving their support system of spiritual leaders and they’re looking for wisdom and advice.

“I think we all need someone outside ourselves in order to help us see where we are blind,” U.K. Leadership developerAboodi Shabi said. “In the past we might have gone to a priest … for guidance, someone outside our lives who could bring new perspectives, or provide a spiritual framework for our lives. I think those are some of the reasons for the growth of coaching in recent times.”

Where Coaching Is Today

As we’ve read, there are hundreds upon hundreds of building blocks which make up the modern industry of coaching: psychology, psychiatry, Gestalt therapy sports coaching, hypnosis, NLP and more.

The beauty of life coaching is that though the industry is made up of more than 100,000 coaches and has literally dozens of niches, the mosaic of interests and specialities is based on the ideas and philosophies of the 20th century’s most influential and well-studied psychologists and psychiatrists.

This strong foundation of science and innovation has led to the heart of the coaching industry: to bring about real change in the lives of the clients with whom coaches partner.

A 2012 study by the international Coach Federation, one of the most respected coaching organizations in the world, showed that coaching clients said their sessions with their coach produced measurable changes in their life.

  • 80% said they had improved self-confidence
  • 73% said they had improved relationships
  • 72% said they had improved communication skills
  • 67% said they had improved life/work balance

Vikki Brock estimates that there are more than 500 coach training centers around that world, and that the coaching industry is growing by 2,500 new coaches per year.

While the future of coaching depends on as many factors as  the past of coaching, one thing is clear: the present state of coaching is transforming the lives of clients whose goal is to become the person they’ve wanted to become and to embrace the aspirations for which they’ve longed.

by -
0 438
Happiness is closer than you think….

Supercoach.com founder and author Michael Neill offers a truly life changing, and potentially controversial, perspective on the pursuit of happiness, fulfillment, and joy.

His message is potent, practical, and surprisingly anti-strategy. He’s on a crusade to save us all from needlessly devoting our time, energy, and money to the consumption of tools and tricks that we hope will make us happy.

The problem with those things, which he refers to as “behavioral Prozac”, is that they are temporary. They work for a while, but the threat of sliding back into the darkness is always looming. Through his books, blogs, and other publications he’s sharing with the world the message of authentic and permanent happiness.

An Increasingly Unhappy World

A little context for why this is so important; According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 350 million people worldwide currently suffer from some form of depression. And that’s only the good news. The bad news? These numbers are on the rise, and since 1990, the instances of depression have increased by nearly a third.

These numbers are bleak and only begin to describe what an epidemic sadness, dissatisfaction, and loneliness have become. We need a solution, and we need it now.

Depressed, Michael Neill, Goaly Blog

As a depressed and suicidal college student on the brink of calamity, one night Michael Neill courageously reached out to the night shift nurse at his university.

As he sat waiting to be checked into the system and given medication to treat his depression, Michael had a revelation – he knew that if he turned his happiness over to other people, that it would always be in the hands of other people. He knew that he had to find a way back to the happiness inside of him.

That night, Michael took a stand and refused to let external forces and circumstances take responsibility for his happiness. He climbed out of the window of the university clinic and went on a search to be happy.

How To Become Happy

Michael has created an eight-part video series sharing his revolutionary perspectives on happiness. He gives us simple and profound guidance on how to get there and stay there.

Woman, Smile, Michael Neill, Goaly Blog

Here’s the best part! This is not about more reflection activities, gratitude journals, or fake-it-till-you-make-it strategies.

Happiness is our very essence and is as universal as the nose on your face. We all have it; we just don’t all know it.

Michael teaches us how to reorient our pursuit of happiness and explains that, in fact, we can stop searching entirely! It was here all along, and what’s even more exciting, we can’t lose it, it can’t be taken away, and it can’t be destroyed. It’s inside of us; it IS us.

Happiness is our very essence and is as universal as the nose on your face. We all have it; we just don’t all know it.

Get back in the driver’s seat and join us on the journey to true happiness and lasting fulfillment. See the video series from www.goaly.com here:

Wanna help spread the word?

Tweetable :: “If happiness is our true nature, why isn’t everyone happy?” Michael Neill of Supercoach.com answers this question. bitly.com/Happy8steps

Tweetable :: Lay off the “behavioral Prozac” and discover the true happiness that is inside of you, just waiting to be ignited!  bitly.com/Happy8steps

Tweetable :: Happiness is closer than you think. You don’t have to go out & get it. It’s inside of you, just waiting to be ignited!  bitly.com/Happy8steps